MORNING-AFTER PILL (EMERGENCY CONTRACEPTION)

How do I know if I should take Emergency Contraception (EC)?

  • You had sexual intercourse without contraception
  • You had a contraceptive accident, such as the condom broke or slipped off
  • Your partner did not “pull out” in time (FYI: the pull out method IS NOT an effective birth control method!)
  • You didn’t take your birth-control correctly in the month before having sex without a condom
  • You were forced to have sex or awoke to realize you were having sex

DON’T PANIC. THERE IS A SOLUTION.

 

What is the Morning-After pill?

It is an emergency contraception pill and unlike other forms of contraception, EC can be used AFTER intercourse to prevent pregnancy. The sooner you take it, the more effective it is!

  • It is effective at 95% to prevent pregnancy if taken in the first 24 hours after the intercourse.
  • It is effective at 60% if taken within 48-72 hours after the intercourse.
Important

YOU SHOULD NOT RELY ON EC AS A BIRTH CONTROL METHOD
IT IS LESS EFFECTIVE ON A LONG TERM BASIS

How does it work?

EC works by thinning out the lining of the uterus, making it very difficult for a fertilized egg to implant itself. It also works by altering the mucus in a woman’s cervix so that it becomes “hostile” to sperm.

Important

YOU WILL NEED TO USE BACK-UP PROTECTION (i.e. CONDOM) UNTIL YOUR NEXT PERIOD

What if I still get pregnant?

In the unlikely event that implantation does occur, EC is not dangerous to the fetus and will not interrupt the pregnancy or put the fetus at risk. You can contact the nurses in Student Health Services to get support and discuss your options.

Are there any side-effects?

EC is very safe but it could cause side-effects such as nausea or vomiting, dizziness or headache. If you vomit within two (2) hours of taking EC, you will need to retake the dose.

The EC can cause a few light days of bleeding right after taking it. This is most likely NOT your real period. Your real period will possibly be a few days early or a few days later than it was scheduled to happen.

How will I know if EC was effective?

You should get your period within three to four (3 to 4) weeks after taking EC. If you do not, you should then take a pregnancy test. If you are pregnant, you should consult a nurse in Student Health Services, or your family doctor, to discuss your options.

Spotting or bleeding is common a few days after taking EC. Your next period may come a week early or a week late. See a nurse in Student Health Services if you have not had your period in the 3 to 4 weeks after taking EC.

Where can I get EC?

  • Dawson College Student Health Services
    Room 2D.2. Monday to Friday.
    FREE
    For current Dawson students ONLY
Important

Please make sure to mention to secretary that you need to see a nurse as soon as possible.

  • Any pharmacy
    EC is free but the consultation with pharmacist is 24-27$. However, your insurance (or parent’s) could cover all fees.
  • CLSC, family doctor or walk-in clinic
    They will give you a prescription so you can obtain EC for free in pharmacy. For help locating the nearest resource, please look here.
  • Head and Hands Medical Clinic (514) 481-0277
    3465 ave Benny, Montreal, H4B 2R9
    Drop-in medical clinic for all youth aged 12-25, regardless of gender, sexuality, race or insurance status. No medicare card needed but PLEASE do bring your health card if you have one.
    Most Tuesday and Thursday evenings (check the calendar for any schedule changes)
    You must arrive at around 4:45pm: at 5pm, a a random draw for 10 spots to see the doctor that evening is done.
Important

The Head & Hands Medical Clinic will be operating at reduced hours for the summer of 2019 as it goes through some major changes. Please make sure to check their Calendar prior to going to the clinic.

 

For more information on emergency contraception (EC), contraceptive methods or STI testing, please see the Health Education Nurse in Room 2D.2, call info-santé at 8-1-1 or visit www.sexandu.ca



Last Modified: June 25, 2019