Comprehensive Examination

What is the Comprehensive Examination?

The Comprehensive Examination (CE) is a ministerial requirement that all students must complete in order to graduate. To pass the CE, a student must demonstrate a mastery of the objectives of his or her program. The format of that evaluation is determined by the individual programs.

The CE is your opportunity to be creative – to apply what you are learning in class to what interests you. It is your opportunity to extend your learning beyond the classroom and to express your individuality on a related project. The CE should give you a taste of what it is to “practice” your subject.

Note

Email: CE@dawsoncollege.qc.ca

For inquiries about all other programs, please contact the appropriate person from the attached list.

Coordinators for All Comprehensive Examinations

FAQ

Can I get my DEC without passing my CE?

NO. This is a ministerial requirement along with the English Exit Test. The Ministry of Education has made these two requirements obligatory for everyone.

Does the CE effect my R Score?

NO. This ministerial requirement is graded on a pass or fail basis. No number grade is given to the completed CE so it cannot be applied to your R Score.

I finished the last of my CE components last semester, so why does my schedule (or attendance verification form, or mid-term examination) say that my CE is IP (which means In Progress)? Why isn’t my CE grade already on my record?

As you accumulate grades for the components of your CE, those grades will be kept on record by the CE Coordinator. Together, the grades will make up one official CE grade. However, that grade will not be added to your official College record until the end of your final semester OR YOUR GRADUATING SEMESTER, i.e. the semester in which your courses left “to do” = 0. This is for administrative reasons only as we need to “register” you in the official course no. with the Ministry at the beginning of the term in order to be able to post your grade at the end of the term.

Do I have to do another CE if I am doing a second DEC?

Yes, each program has their own specifique requirements which must be met.

Transferring from one program into another program?

If you are transferring from one program to another at Dawson College and you have already completed some of the courses with CE requirements in them, you must contact the person in charge of the new program’s Comprehensive Examination (from the list above). You may get equivalencies for some of the requirements or you may need to do extra work to catch up.

You may be redirected to the chairperson in charge of the particular course in question (French, Humanities, Biology…). Please advise the Comprehensive Examination Coordinator of all decisions made between you and the Chairperson.

You cannot graduate if you do not complete all components of your CE. It is your responsibility to keep track.

Transferring into a program at Dawson from a different college?

If you are transferring to Dawson from another college, please inform yourself on the comprehensive examination requirements necessary for your program at Dawson. Just because substitutions or equivalencies are given for a course from another college, does not mean the CE component in that course is automatically considered completed.

Please advise the Comprehensive Examination Coordinator of the situation and they may refer you to the appropriate chairperson for that course. Remember to always advise the CE Coordinator all decisions in these matters.

You cannot graduate if you do not complete all components of your CE. It is your responsibility to keep track.

ACCOUNTING AND MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY – 410.B0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Accounting?

The Comprehensive Examination assesses the student’s integration of the skills, knowledge and attitudes acquired in the three years of the program. To pass the Specific Education and General Education components of the Comprehensive Examination, students must pass:

  • The Accounting Internship course (410-664-DW), including the French component
  • All required General Education courses.

ARTS, LITERATURE & COMMUNICATION – 500

(AL, G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G6, DM, FM, A1)

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in A.L.C.?

The Arts, Literature and Communication CE consists of two components: 1. the ‘projet specifique’ in the Block ‘B’ French course and 2. The major project in the Integrating Activity course.

When a student has passed both components (RE- reussi), they have passed the Arts, Literature and Communication CE. The student will be registered in the Arts, Literature and Communication CE (by the Registrar’s Office) in the same semester as they are registered in the Integrating Activity since the A.L.C. Program grid calls for the French Block ‘B’ course to generally have been completed one or two semesters earlier.

To verify your progress with these projects, please refer to your Comprehensive Examination Profile Page in your Omnivox Portal under MyIntranet. Both projects need to have an “RE” for you to have passed your CE in A.L.C. If you see an ‘EC’ – echec, you need to contact your project teacher immediately to see if you can redo the project in question.

I am still in C.A.L.L. How does that work?

Creative Arts, Literature & Language (CALL)

The C.A.L.L. CE consists of two components, one done in the French Block ‘B’ course and the other in the Integrating Activity. When a student has passed both components, he has passed the C.A.L.L. CE.

In C.A.L.L., the main component of the CE is the production and/or presentation of a project or work of art or criticism. To pass the CE you must show that you can integrate the knowledge and skills you acquired in your studies, as outlined in the Exit Profile.

In C.A.L.L., the CE takes place as part of the Integrating Activity course, which you will take in your last term. The project is usually due by the 12th week of the course, while oral presentations, criticism and self-assessment components may take place between the 12th and final weeks. Any necessary corrections or revisions to your project will normally be due by the final week of that term.

CE projects are graded on a Pass/Fail basis within one week following the end of classes. If you do not pass the CE by the end of the term or receive a grade of Not Written, you may, with permission of your instructor and Profile Coordinator, arrange for late submission or resubmission of your project.

If you still do not pass, you must return the following term to register for the Integrating Activity course.

Please note that the Integrating Activity course is not offered every term, and it is never offered in the summer. You may appeal your grade by following the procedures outlined in the college’s Institutional Student Evaluation Policy (ISEP).

The student will be registered in the C.A.L.L. CE (by the Registrar’s Office) in the same semester as he is registered in the Integrating Activity since the CALL Program grid calls for the French Block ‘B’ course to have been completed one or two semesters earlier.

To verify your progress with these projects, please refer to your Comprehensive Examination Profile Page in your Omnivox Portal under MyIntranet. Both projects need to have an “RE” for you to have passed your CE in A.L.C. If you see an ‘EC’ – echec, you need to contact your project teacher immediately to see if you can redo the project in question.

BIOMEDICAL LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY – 140.C0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in BioMed Lab?

The Comprehensive Examination of students in the Biomedical Laboratory Technology Program will be completed during their final year of studies. The intent of this examination is to evaluate in the graduating student the acquisition of necessary skills, knowledge, attitudes and judgment as deemed necessary for entry into the workplace and society.

The Comprehensive Examination will consist of the following components:

  1. The results of the internship evaluations completed during the clinical internship rotations. These evaluations assess the ability of the student to perform in the workplace and are based on both technical capability and professional conduct. Students must demonstrate these skills and abilities by completing the objectives in the Clinical Internship and Global Log Books. The logbooks are used to assess:
  • Technical competence in each of the major disciplines of medical laboratory practice;
  • Sufficient skill procuring blood specimens;
  • Effective critical thinking and research skills;
  • Ability to adapt to change in the workplace and the profession;
  • Effective use of human and material resources;
  • Effective communication, both in French and in English, with hospital staff and patients;
  • Appropriate professional conduct, including:
    • Collaboration / interaction with hospital staff;
    • Respect of patient confidentiality;
    • Respect of established protocols.

The objectives of the Clinical Internship Logbooks and the Global Logbook are evaluated by designated hospital clinical instructors and Dawson clinical coordinators.

  1. Students must pass a written examination, which will be multidisciplinary and will test primarily the situational-analysis and problem-solving skills of the student. This examination will take place during the week prior to the national professional certification examinations.
  1. As part of their professional responsibilities to promote the profession and Program, students must participate in at least one promotional activity (e.g., Open House) during their three years of study. This participation could consist of attending an event as a volunteer or preparing a demonstration/poster for public information.
  1. In order to meet the General Education components of the Comprehensive Examination, students must pass all of their required General Education courses.

CIVIL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY – 221.B0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Civil Engineering?

The intent of the comprehensive Examination in the Civil Engineering Technology Program is to evaluate whether students have acquired the professional skills, knowledge and judgment deemed necessary for entry into the workplace.

The activities related to the Comprehensive Examination in the Civil Engineering Technology Program are associated with the following:

  • The Stage Preparation course, 221-491-DW
  • Stage in Industry
  • The Stage Evaluation course, 221-593-DW
  • Oral presentation in the Block B French course related to the specific education component of the program
  • Major projects in the fields of structural, infrastructure and environmental design administered through the courses Wood Structures 221-886 DW, Steel Structures 221-685 DW, Roads II 221-655-DW, and Building Systems 221-677-DW
  • Comprehensive presentation in the 6th semester will focus on the integration of student knowledge and overall experience in the program.

COMMUNITY RECREATION & LEADERSHIP TRAINING – 391.A0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in C.R.L.T.?

The Comprehensive Examination will consist of three sections:

  1. An Internship Evaluation Form from the Internship course passed and signed by the student and the on-site and faculty supervisor.
  2. An oral and written synthesis of their Internship experience focusing on their application of    knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviors acquired during the three-year program. This will be evaluated by the student’s faculty supervisor.
  3. Completion of the program-specific written and oral requirements of the Block B French course.

COMPUTER SCIENCE TECHNOLOGY- 420.A0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Computer Science?

The Comprehensive Examination is designed to allow the student to demonstrate his or her preparedness to function at an entry level in the profession. The student will demonstrate the attainment of Specific Education competencies and the integration of the General Education competencies as described in the Exit Profile.

The components of the Comprehensive Examination that take place within the context of the Internship course are:

  • An assessment by the employer, this assessment to include technical and professional, ethical, analytical, communication skills, and lifestyle and health issues pertaining to the work place.
  • The submission by the student of a final report that will be evaluated by the internship coordinator, addressing the issues enumerated above.

An additional component of the Comprehensive Examination is:

  • The successful completion of a project related to the student’s field of study, carried out in the Block‐B French course

A grade of pass or fail will be assigned for the comprehensive examination.

Students who fail the Comprehensive Examination can request a Grade Review.

DIAGNOSTIC IMAGING – 142.A0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Diagnostic imaging?

The Program Coordinator is responsible for submitting the grades for the CE. The compilation of the CE grades and rescheduling of rewrites for unsuccessful students is done by the DI Department.

Diagnostic Imaging students will have to successfully complete a Comprehensive Examination in their professional discipline as one of the requirements to obtain the DEC.  The student must have completed the DEC in Diagnostic Imaging to be eligible to write the “ordre des technologues en imagerie médicale, en radio-oncologie et en électrophysiologie médicale du Québec” (OTIMROEPMQ) qualifying examination.

The CE examination will be given at the end of the 6th semester of the three-year program, and is structured as follows:

Format

  1. Written Component: 50%
  • Final Exam containing100-150 multiple choice questions based on 10-15 case studies. This component is scheduled in mid-May during the final exam period, (one half day). Mock of the OTIMROEPMQ qualifying exam. (40%)
  • Written assignment(s) which demonstrate(s) the ability to present information clearly and concisely (for example, the student could be asked to write about a clinical incident). This component is written on the morning of the Oral Examination component. (10%)
  1. Clinical Component: 30%
  • A practical examination will be conducted by the Clinical Instructor and/or Clinical Coordinator during the Clinical 6 course.
  1. Oral Examination: (involves the Radiological Community) 20%
  • This examination is scheduled during the last week of April or first week in May
  • This examination will be conducted by: Chief Technologists, Radiologists and/or Senior Technologists
  • This section may include a French component.

Evaluation

  • A minimum mark of 60% is required in each of the three components – written, clinical and oral.
  • Only one rewrite will be permitted per component(s) in the event of failure.
  • Rewrites should take place before the deadline for final grades submission.
  • If the candidate is unsuccessful in the rewrite(s), he/she will not graduate.

Time Frame

  • Late April-Early May: Oral and Practical
  • Mid-May: Mock OTIMROEPMQ Exams
  • End of May: Rewrites if necessary

This Comprehensive Examination is based on the Competency Profile of the CAMRT and the Terminal Objectives of the OTIMROEPMQ, with input from the hospitals affiliated with Dawson College.

ELECTRONIC ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY – 243.BO & B3


How does the Comprehensive Examination work in ElectroTech?

The basis for the comprehensive Examination of a graduating student is determined by the student’s performance in the Computer Networks or Telecommunication project course and the evaluation of their project presentation. Since the project course reflects the culmination of knowledge, skills and competencies achieved throughout the program, it seemed logical to carry out the comprehensive Examination in conjunction with the two project courses given.

The Comprehensive Examination will consist of five sections:

  1. Completion of the final project
  2. A written technical manual of the final project
  3. A verbal interview of the final project work or a Q&A during the Project Fair
  4. A written, multiple-choice, comprehensive final exam
  5. Completion of the Block B French course requirement of a written and oral program-specific project assignment.

Passing the Comprehensive Examination signifies that the student is able to integrate the competencies represented in the Exit (Graduate) Profile.

Students have the opportunity and must demonstrate a functional project, usually on the last week of classes.  Members of industry are invited to Dawson to see our student’s achievements and ask questions.  In the past students have obtained employment based on their project.  In addition, administration, faculty and students are invited to participate.

GRAPHIC DESIGN – 570.A0


How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Graphic Design?

By the end of the sixth semester a student having completed and passed all the required courses has de facto acquired the 24 competencies. The final portfolio also demonstrates the student’s comple­tion of the required assignments. Therefore, the function of the comprehensive examination is not to re-evaluate the specific objectives of the courses but to establish whether the student has acquired an overall competency. In other words the pieces fitting together give an overall picture of a graphic designer ready to integrate into the work place.

Rather than putting in place a written, oral or design exam at the end of the semester, it has been decided that an ongoing assessment of the student during the sixth semester would be a more meaningful way of determining these global characteristics.

For example, the comprehensive examination will show whether the student has grasped the overall concept of client approach and applies it consistently to all design work, rather than simply when a learning activity requires it.

The exhibition, taking place at the end of the sixth semester, for which students jointly prepare all aspects including fund-raising and promotion provides an excellent opportunity for them to dem­onstrate their team approach. For instance, do they participate responsibly and are they successful in interpersonal problem solving? These essential skills will be used when they take up positions on design teams in the work place. Therefore it is appropriate for the student’s contribution to the exhi­bition to be part of the comprehensive examination.

Finally, the build-up to the exhibition provides plenty of opportunity for the students to demonstrate their ability to manage stress when working to tight deadlines. Are students able to allot the appro­priate amount of time to all projects? Can they manage time effectively for the preparation of their individual website, the preparation of their spread page in the graduate exhibition catalog and finally, the preparation of their own exhibit space?

For the final grade, individual sixth semester’s grades are compiled and averaged for the Comprehensive Examination. A student failing more than one course cannot participate at the graduate student exhibition of the current year. His work cannot be published, exhibited and put online. The student could participate in the following year if courses are passed with success.

ILLUSTRATION – 574.A0


How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Illustration?

All students registered in the Illustration Program must pass the Comprehensive Examination in order to graduate. All components of the Comprehensive Examination must be successfully completed in order for

students to obtain a “Pass” standing.

Comprehensive Examination Components – Specific Education

  • A digital portfolio presenting an overview of illustration projects created within the Illustration Program. Each student will submit his/her individual digital portfolio in the context of the Production and Presentation course.
  • Participation in the design and production of the Graduation Exhibition which takes place at the end of the sixth term. Planning for the exhibition will take place in the Production and Presentation course.

Students work collaboratively in teams to prepare all aspects of the exhibition including the design
of a promotional poster, invitation, and website portal (which provides access to each student’s
individual portfolio).

Students must curate their work for display, prepare appropriate formats and presentation of their selected work to professional standards, and design the exhibition space layout.
Performance of these tasks, the ability to work in a team, and effective management of time
and stress will be evaluated.

  • A bilingual (English and French) résumé demonstrating integration of writing and professional layout

skills with knowledge of the job function of an illustrator. The résumé is submitted in the context of the

Professional Practice course.

Comprehensive Examination Components – General Education

In order to meet the General Education components of the Comprehensive Examination, students must

pass all of their required General Education courses.

Updated Winter 2019

INDUSTRIAL DESIGN – 570.C0


How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Industrial Design?

The Industrial Design Techniques Program is based upon a principle of integrated learning, in which competencies of increasing complexity and scope lead to a summative competency, termed the Exit Profile. This profile serves as the focal point for all of the learning activities of the program-specific and general education curricula. The Exit Profile encompasses the knowledge and skills that an industrial design technician will need to have to enter the job market upon graduation from Dawson College. 

Comprehensive Examination

The aim of the Comprehensive Examination is to evaluate the students’ ability to synthesize the competencies and to demonstrate the skills and abilities needed to enter the profession as outlined in the Exit Profile. The Comprehensive Examination must be passed in order to receive a DEC from Dawson College in 570.C0 Industrial Design Techniques Program.

Comprehensive Examination Framework

The vehicle for the Comprehensive Examination is the thesis project that is started at the beginning of the fifth term and terminates with the Graduates’ Exhibition at the end of the sixth term.

Upon graduation, Industrial Design students, as outlined in the Exit Profile, will demonstrate proficiency in the following areas:  

  1. Ascertaining the project brief

Accurate comprehension of written documents

Accurate comprehension of graphic documents

Knowledge of identified manufacturing processes and constraints

  1. Executing the project

Manifest creative design concept exploration and research

Integrate criteria of functionality, usability, and semantics

  1. Functioning under the supervision of a senior designer or project manager

Ability to follow directions

Ability to work autonomously and in a team environment

Demonstrate constructive problem solving

  1. Refining the project

Synthesize critical evaluation and project criteria

Communicate design development and features through two-dimensional and three-dimensional media

Accurately document design development interventions

  1. Documenting the project

Accurate design concept documentation

  • Critical thinking evaluated in concept design
  • Accurate technical documentation
  • Writing is evaluated on the basis of thoroughness, clarity, comprehension and detail.
  • Accurate project presentation
  • Term end department presentations
  • Accurate reporting and documentation of design modifications
  1. Additional Criteria

Professional Portfolio course

  • Cover letter and portfolio are required to be done in French and English

The comprehensive examination is determined by a pass or fail. This is evaluated by the three teachers of Design Studio 6 with consultation from all teachers of the Industrial Design department.

Here is an example of how the comprehensive examination is phrased in the UCLA architecture school…which is very much like how we do this.

Comprehensive Examination Plan UCLA School of Architecture

All M. Arch.I students must complete the comprehensive examination, a requirement that is satisfied as follows:

The comprehensive examination requirement is fulfilled through the completion of Architecture and Urban Design 403C in Spring Quarter and the final design project for this course. The examination committee consists of at least three faculty members appointed by the department chair. The examination is administered and evaluated for satisfactory performance by the examination committee. The committee evaluates the final design projects in the following terms: pass (a unanimous vote), pass subject to revision of the final design project, or fail (majority vote). No reexaminations are permitted. When the final design project is passed subject to revision, one member of the committee is assigned the responsibility of working with the student on the revision and determining when the final design project has been satisfactorily revised.

Two positive votes from the committee constitute a pass on the comprehensive examination. No reexaminations are permitted. The degree is awarded on recommendation of the faculty committee.

INTERIOR DESIGN – 570.E0


How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Interior Design?

Part 1 – Written Component – 20%

Students will be given a written exercise on a topic related to design. This will take place near the end of the Winter Term or in the Examination Period (notification will be sent in advance). Students will be allowed to work on computers, use spell-check and grammar-check.

Part 2 – Oral Presentation – 20%

Each student will give a verbal presentation of their final project to a jury of two to three members, comprised of faculty members (minimum of one) and/or interior design professionals. This will be scheduled for the last classes of Interior Design VI.

Part 3 – Vernissage Exhibit and Summary of Work– 60%

Students will participate in the organization and mounting of an exhibition of their projects from Interior Design VI. Students will be assessed as part of their Professional Practice: Theory course.

Each student will submit a Summary of Work (11” x 17” format) to a Moodle Drop Box the day before Vernissage. The Summary will include the following assignments and projects completed during the program:

Section A: Technical Drawings

  • Construction Documents III – Office Set. Clearly identify which portions each member of the team completed. You will be required to submit a corrected version of your portion of the project based on feedback given by the instructor. (Submit your instructor’s marked up drawings as a reference. These will be collected in an envelope the day before Vernissage.)
  • Colour & Lighting II – Photo of light fixture prototype AND related drawing(s) OR Photos of Tunnel project AND related drawing(s).

Section B: Building Code, Specifications and French Component

  • Building Code Summary from Interior Design VI.
  • A construction drawing including specifications (must be a different example than the Office Set)
  • A construction drawing with French annotations from Construction Documents III or IV.

Section C: Design Process

  • Design process from the Interior Design V Community Project.
  • Furniture Design & Construction – Documentation of design process and model construction, photo of scale model, colour 3D view and technical drawing set for the Table Design project.

Section D: Contributing Disciplines

One example of a project from any of the Fine Arts courses, such as:

  • 510 courses
  • 520 courses

Part 4 – General Education

General Education forms an essential component of the program’s content. Students must successfully complete all General Education courses in order to receive a passing grade for the Comprehensive Examination and to obtain their diploma. Some General Education disciplines require that students pass specific assignments in order to pass a course. 

*Students with Substitutions or Equivalencies for any of the above courses do not need to submit material for them. Written confirmation via MIO to the department chairs is required. 

Updated Winter 2019

LABORATORY TECHNOLOGY AND ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY – 210.AB

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in LabTech?

The CE requirements in Laboratory Technology – Analytical Chemistry Program is to pass the following course:

1.   Laboratory Technology Project – 210-693-DW

 

LIBERAL ARTS – 700 (B0, B1, B2)

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Liberal Arts?

The Comprehensive Examination, done by students under the supervision of one or more teachers in the program, allows students to demonstrate the capacity for synthesis: that is, to focus and employ the abilities and the knowledge acquired in the program. It is located in the Integrative Seminar for Liberal Arts course (360-199-DW), taken in the fourth term of the program. It is a large scale research project, or a series of smaller, related projects. The Comprehensive Examination pursues one or more of the main themes or problems of the course, involves many of the themes or disciplinary areas of the program, and draws upon the range of knowledge and abilities acquired in the disciplines and courses of the program.

The Comprehensive Examination stands apart from the normal requirements of the course, such as tests and assignments, and is evaluated in its own right. Components of the Comprehensive Examination which are connected to or reflect important parts of the course may contribute to the evaluation of students in the course. The project is supervised and graded by the teachers of the Integrative Seminar for Liberal Arts course (360-199-DW) and by other teachers as the nature of the student’s project may suggest.

The Comprehensive Examination and the Integrative Seminar in the design of the Liberal Arts program, the fourth term, is meant to have an integrative character. In this spirit, the students may bring to bear their research for the Comprehensive Examination (and any other academic aspect of the program) upon their presentations in the Integrative Seminar of the fourth term. By this means the Integrative Seminar fulfills in part its function of integration: it provides a forum for the disciplined discussion and elaboration of issues touching the two other courses of the fourth term (English and Humanities), and arising from the program curriculum as a whole. The basis of Examination in the Seminar is its own assignments and presentations, oral and written.

Additional information:

Grades for the Comprehensive Examination (pass/fail) are submitted to the College by the Program Coordinator.

If a student fails the Comprehensive Examination, he/she first contacts the instructor of the Integrative Seminar for Liberal Arts course (360-199-DW) since that is where the research project that makes up the CE is located (see detailed description above). If the issue cannot be resolved by the course instructor, the program coordinator is consulted regarding further action.

MARKETING & MANAGEMENT TECHNOLOGY – 410.D0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Marketing?

The Comprehensive Examination assesses the student’s integration of the skills, knowledge and attitudes acquired in the three years of the program. To pass the Specific Education and General Education components of the Comprehensive Examination, students must pass:

 

  • The Marketing Internship course (410-614-DW), including the French component;
  • All required General Education courses.

MECHANICAL ENGINEERING TECHNOLOGY – 241.A0

Our Comprehensive Examination takes the form of a tangible project given to each student in their final semester. The chosen project, which changes from year to year, encompasses all key facets of the 3 year program including:

  • Scope, approach and concept
  • Documentation and blueprint creation
  • design
  • process planning
  • manufacturing
  • teamwork
  • quality control and inspection
  • follow through and finished product

Student projects are graded on the above criteria and must demonstrate a sufficient competency in each of these areas in order to graduate.

Our Comprehensive Examination is Project Based and is realized over and entire semester, as such; there is ample time to provide feedback to students who might be at risk of failing.

Grades are submitted by the Chairperson for the Mech Tech department.

Our comprehensive Examination project is embedded in the following two courses for the Automation and Design options respectively: 241-693-DW- Manufacturing Project (For the Automation group) and  241-692-DW – Design Project (For the Design group)

NURSING – 180.A0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Nursing?

Final Grade for Nursing 180-616-DW

In order to pass the course the student must:

Achieve a “Meets Expectation” level of clinical performance for all the performance criteria in each of the 5 competencies of the Nursing 616 course

Achieve an academic mark of 60% as per college policy based on the 2 exams.

Students who do not meet the clinical performance criteria will receive a 55% final grade for Nursing 616 or the academic grade, whichever is lower.

Comprehensive Examination (Épreuve Synthèse)

The Ministry of Education requires that all students, upon completion of the academic program, be evaluated in terms of their comprehensive knowledge. After successful completion of the Nursing program, students will be required to obtain a passing grade for the Comprehensive Examination.

COMPREHENSIVE EXAMINATION FOR NURSING 180- Approved by Program Committee Nov 17, 2014

Students must achieve all of the following in order to pass the comprehensive examination

1.       Receive a satisfactory clinical evaluation from two nursing instructors and a designated member of the hospital staff

2.       Demonstrate an adequate level of theoretical knowledge by successfully completing the Internship course

3.       Receive a satisfactory evaluation from two Program faculty using the Integration of Student Learning Assessment Form

INTEGRATION OF STUDENT LEARNING ASSESSMENT FORM

The student will be evaluated in the last week in stage on 2 separate dates by 2 separate nursing faculty

who will indicate a P or F for each criteria

IN THE PROFESSIONAL SETTING THE STUDENT: FACULTY A FACULTY B
1 Demonstrates critical-thinking skills.
2 Applies the nursing process.
3 Communicates effectively in English
4 Communicates effectively in French  
5 Demonstrates an understanding of ethical issues
6 Adheres to the ethical and legal standards of practice established by the professional order
7 Demonstrates through attitude and conduct, a commitment to continuous professional growth and improvement  
8 Adapts to diverse environments and work situations
9 Collaborates with members of a healthcare team
10 Delivers safe, individualized, holistic care and instruction to clients of all ages
11 Effectively manages the emotional and physical demands and the health and safety concerns of the workplace.
12 Demonstrates the ability to link lifestyle behaviours that promote health with the practice of nursing
13 Demonstrates an awareness of worldviews and cultural diversity
Overall Assessment Pass  / Fail Pass  / Fail
Faculty A: printed name                                                                           Signature
Faculty B: printed name                                                                           Signature
Date of assessment by  Faculty A Date of assessment by Faculty B:
  Final Assessment PASS / FAIL
Chairperson/Coordinator Signature:                                                               Date:
Student Name: Student Number:

PHYSIOTHERAPY TECHNOLOGY – 144.A0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Physiotherapy Technology?

Introduction:

As stated in Dawson College’s Institutional Student Evaluation Policy (ISEP), “As part of the requirements for completion of all DEC programs, students are required to complete an assessment which demonstrates that they have met the program’s objectives and standards integrating the knowledge acquired in their program of studies, including the general education component.”

Individual programs are responsible for developing and establishing the procedures for this assessment, termed the Comprehensive Examination.  This document describes the Comprehensive Examination developed for the Physiotherapy Technology (144.A0) program.

Evaluation Procedure

The Comprehensive Examination consists of two parts:

Part One: 

Students must successfully complete the Internship courses (144-698-DW and 144-699-DW)

In these courses, a non-faculty physiotherapist or physiotherapy technologist, whose name appears on the membership roll of the OPPQ1, evaluates the student using the Internship Student Performance Evaluation (Appendix 1).  A Dawson College faculty member then uses this evaluation tool to assign the student a grade for the internship course (Appendix 1).

Part Two:

Students must receive a satisfactory evaluation for the clinical components of the Internships (I and II). Criteria for the evaluation of students for part two, was determined by the Physiotherapy Technology Program Committee, and is based on the knowledge, skills and attitudes described in the Exit Profile. A grade of pass or fail will be assigned for the comprehensive examination.

This part of the Comprehensive Examination consists of an evaluation that is to be completed by a Dawson College faculty member who teaches within the Physiotherapy Technology program and whose name appears on the membership roll of the Ordre professionnel de la physiothérapie du Québec (OPPQ)[1].    The examination is to be completed in the last semester of the student’s studies, during their Internship I (144-698-DW) and Internship II (144-699-DW) courses.

The faculty member will complete the evaluation based on the student’s performance in their Internship I (144-698-DW) and Internship II (144-699-DW) courses (Part I described above).  That is, the Faculty member will take the results of the Internship Student Performance Evaluation into account in grading the student’s Comprehensive Examination.

When necessary, the faculty member may also choose to communicate directly with the student’s internship supervisor, and/or perform an on-site visit(s), to obtain further insight as to the student’s performance during internship and their ability to meet the requirements of the CE.

Criteria for the evaluation of students by the Dawson College faculty member, is based on the knowledge, skills and attitudes described in the Exit Profile as well as the Essential Competencies for the Physiotherapy Technologist as outlined by the OPPQ.  More specifically, the Comprehensive Examination evaluates the student’s:

  1. Sense of responsibility;
  2. Communication and interpersonal skills;
  3. Sense of professionalism;
  4. Knowledge acquired throughout the curriculum;
  5. Ability to apply knowledge acquired and clinical judgment.

A grade of “pass” or “fail” will be assigned to the Comprehensive Examination.

A passing grade must be achieved in each of the 5 sections.  Failure to achieve a pass in any one of the 5 sections will result in failure of the comprehensive examination.

Students who fail to pass the Comprehensive Exam will be:

  • Required to repeat the internship course associated with the Comprehensive Exam;
  • Assigned a maximum grade of 55% in the internship course associated with the failed exam;
  • Provided with a second and final opportunity to repeat the failed internship course and pass the Comprehensive Examination.

Grade Appeal

As per ISEP

1 Code des professions, chapitre C-26, r. 193. Règlement sur certaines activités professionnelles pouvant être exercées en physiothérapie. Québec: Éditeur official du Québec, August 2013.

PROFESSIONAL PHOTOGRAPHY –  570.F0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Photography?

The comprehensive examination takes place during the third year of the Program, within the context of the Photo Production I and II courses, the Professional Practices II course, and the third year portfolio presentations.

Students write a reflection essay and present two portfolios in selected areas of specialization. The portfolios are presented as websites, as mounted prints which are presented in a graduation exhibition and as printed promotional materials.

These activities combined constitute the comprehensive Examination for the Professional Photography Program. Students must pass each of these components to successfully complete the comprehensive Examination and graduate from the program.  Students should demonstrate their facility and mastery of the breadth of their abilities, knowledge, technique, attitudes and communication skills.

The portfolios are judged on the following:

  • Camera and lighting skills
  • Style, concept and aesthetics
  • Digital image manipulation and file management
  • Professional presentation techniques

The full faculty assess the portfolios. The teachers supervising the exhibit, web and publication elements the comprehensive Examination submit their respective Examinations to the chair.   Professionals from the photographic industry judge and critique selected work from the portfolios in a public critique at the end of the sixth term.

In order to participate in the public critique and the exhibition components of the comprehensive Examination, students must have successfully completed all their fifth term courses, and must have passed the fifth and sixth term portfolio judging component of the comprehensive Examination.

For students following a Plan of Studies (as described in the Academic Standing and Advancement Policy):

Participation in the public critique and exhibition components of the comprehensive Examination in the sixth term will be conditional on the student demonstrating to the Program Coordinator via the midterm Examination or a note from their instructor that they are in the process of successfully completing the missing courses from the earlier terms.

The chair of the department submits the Comprehensive Examination grade to the College.

PROFESSIONAL THEATRE – 561.C0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Theatre?

All students enrolled in the Professional Theatre (Acting) Program must pass the Comprehensive Examination in order to graduate. All components of the Comprehensive Examination must be successfully completed in order for a student to be awarded a “Pass.” 

The Professional Theatre Program’s Comprehensive Examination takes place in the third and final year and examines the actor’s ability to audition professionally to portray a character and to interpret a text competently utilizing the skills and techniques acquired throughout the training. Furthermore the student must demonstrate an understanding of the artistic process of acting through his/her ability to articulate that process clearly in college-level English using critical thinking skills and the terminology of the professional theatre artist. The Comprehensive Examination is divided into three installments:

Part One:  An evaluation of the student’s ability to audition 

The following materials and components are required for Part One:

  1. a resume and photograph;
  2. a monologue from one of Shakespeare’s plays;
  3. a monologue from a contemporary play;
  4. an unaccompanied song;
  5. a cold reading.

Components (2), (3) and (4) should not exceed a total of five minutes. The cold reading will be provided at the audition.

Objectives

Success in Part One will be determined by the student’s ability to: prepare for and present professional auditions; integrate stagecraft and special skills; meet the physical, mental and technical demands of the profession; utilize physical, vocal, emotional and creative strategies to develop and sustain characters. 

Part Two:  An evaluation of the student’s engagement and performance in the second and third major productions. 

Objectives

Success in Part Two will be determined by the student’s ability to: prepare for and present professional-level auditions; analyze text for performance; research the cultural, sociological and historical context of roles; adapt to diverse acting methods, trends, styles and directing techniques; utilize physical, vocal, emotional and creative strategies to develop and sustain characters; meet the physical, mental and technical demands of the profession; integrate stagecraft and special skills in movement, voice and improvisation in performance; work both autonomously and collaboratively in a safe, respectful and disciplined manner; draw upon acquired skills, knowledge and learning attitudes to continually improve skills and evolve as an artist; demonstrate understanding of ethical issues and adhere to the ethical and legal practices of the profession.

Part Three: A one-page written summary (A) and oral examination (B) wherein the student will be required to describe the tools and processes that she/he has developed in order to work in the professional world as an actor and freelance artist. In (B), one question will be asked by a Theatre Department faculty member and answered by the student in French to satisfy the French oral component.

Objectives

Success in Part Three will be determined by the student’s ability to think critically and to communicate effectively using professional terminology how she/he would: analyze a text for performance; research the cultural, sociological and historical context of roles; utilize physical, vocal, emotional and creative strategies to develop and sustain characters; meet the physical, mental and technical demands of the profession; draw upon acquired skills, knowledge and learning attitudes to continually improve skills and evolve as an artist; incorporate entrepreneurial skills in building and managing a professional career; assume the role of artist in society; and effectively articulate ideas, concepts and techniques in English.

Part One and Part Three of the Comprehensive Examination will be adjudicated by a minimum of three teachers of the Professional Theatre Program. Marking will be based on a pass/fail system. In order to pass, the student will need a majority of pass assessments from the committee. Part Two will be adjudicated by the assigned directors of the second and third majors (Rehearsal and Performance I and II).  The student must pass both courses.

Part One of the examination will take place at the end of the fifth term, Part Two will take place during the production period for the second and third majors. Part Three (A) will take place at the end of the fifth term, and Part Three (B) will take place at the end of the sixth term. Part One may be repeated at the end of the sixth term by those who fail. Part Three may be repeated before the College grade deadline. Part Two may be repeated in a designated production if and when the student gains readmission to the program. The result of each section of the assessment will be communicated to the student within one week of completion.

General Education

In order to meet the General Education components of the Comprehensive Examination:

  • Students must pass the Block B French course and the projet spécifique to satisfy the French written component.
  • Students must pass the Block B Humanities course.
  • Students must pass a 103 Physical Education course in which they successfully plan, carry out and document an approved physical activity program.
  • Students must pass Block B English for the English written component.

Updated June 2017

RADIATION ONCOLOGY – 142.C0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Radiation Oncology?

Format and Evaluation of the Comprehensive Examination

(142.C0 November 19th 2014)

 

  1. Promotion of the profession “Complete / Incomplete”
  2. Written Component …………………………………………………………………… 50%

The written component is part of the Integration course 142-BZP-03

  • 200-250 multiple choice questions based on case studies
    (Mock1 and Mock2 OTIMROEPMQ exams). 40%
  • Written report which demonstrate(s) the ability to present
    information clearly and concisely. 10%
  1. Clinical Component (Clinical 4 to Clinical 7) ………………………………………… 30%

Practical examinations conducted by the Clinical Instructors and/or Clinical Coordinator

The Clinical Log Book showing that all competencies have been covered (including professional development), must be completed and submitted to have the Comprehensive Exam grades released. Failure to submit the Log Book will result in an incomplete grade.

  1. Oral Examination (Clinical 7) ………………………………………………………… 20%
  • This examination will be conducted by Radiation Oncology
    Dawson Staff and/or Clinical Instructors during the final examination period.

 

A MINIMUM GRADE OF 60% IS REQUIRED FOR EACH OF THE THREE GRADED COMPONENTS

 

SCIENCE – 200 (H1, P1, B1, B2, C0, E2)

Note

REGISTER YOUR INDEPENDENT STUDY IN SCIENCE:
The Independent Study in Science can only be done in your 3rd or 4th semester.

Your IS cannot be done in a Continuing Education course unless you are in the Science Cont.Ed. program.

Your IS cannot be done in a summer course unless you are in a Science Program and it has been approved by the Science Program Coordinator first and your cooperating teacher second.

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in science?

To achieve an “RE” or passing grade on your CE in Science, you must demonstrate that you have acquired competencies that are appropriate for a student graduating from a College Science Program. A few key examples of those “competencies” would be: to apply the experimental method; to communicate effectively; to construct a personal system of values related to Science; to apply acquired knowledge and skills to new situations. The full list of competencies can be found in the Science Program Description. You will meet your CE requirement by completing four projects in four different courses, one in each of the following:

  • Biology NYA course
  • French Block ‘B’ course
  • Humanities Block ‘B’ course
  • A third or fourth semester Science option course, chosen from an approved list, or an independent project pre-approved by the Science Program Committee.

The projects in Biology, French and Humanities will be assigned by the teacher. The fourth project, referred to as the “Independent Study in Science”, will be done in connection with a Science option course – or pre-approved activity – in the third or subsequent semesters. You need to register to do this component.

How is the Comprehensive Examination work graded in Science?

GRADING

Biology 101-NYA-05 and Independent Study (I.S.): These components will be graded base on:

  • quality of work and
  • level of guidance received

In this scheme, the following grade assignments are proposed:

Grade Basis for Grade
9 – 10 Outstanding quality with little or no guidance
8 Outstanding quality with a fair degree of guidance, or very good quality with little or no guidance
7 Satisfactory quality
6 Barely acceptable quality
< 6 Unacceptable at the College Level

French Block ‘B’: Your Projet Spécifique assignment will receive both a number grade and a Pass or Fail grade (based on 60%=Pass). The number grade will count toward your French course grade, and the Pass or Fail will count as one of the four components in your CE grade. Note: If you achieve less that 60% on your “Projet Spécifique”, you must make arrangements with your teacher to rework your assignment so as to bring it up to a Pass to fulfill the Science CE requirement.

Humanities Block ‘B’: You will write an essay on a science-related ethical issue, for which you will receive both a number grade and a Pass or Fail grade (based on 60%=Pass). The number grade will count toward your Humanities course grade, and the Pass or Fail will count as one of the four components in your CE grade. If you fail the essay, you will fail the course and have to redo the course.

Which courses are approved for the Independent Study component in Science?

  • 101-BZH-05  Elements of Human Anatomy and Physiology
  • 101-BZP-DW  Environmental Biology
  • 202-BZF-05  Organic Chemistry I
  • 202-BZG-05  Organic Chemistry II
  • 205-BZG-05  Physical Geology
  • 201-NYC-05  Linear Algebra
  • 201-BZF-05  Calculus III
  • 201-BZS-05  Probability and Statistics
  • 203-NYC-05  Waves, Optics and Modern Physics (Health Science profile ONLY)
  • 203-NYB-05  Electricity and Magnetism
  • 203-BZE-05  Engineering Physics
  • 203-BZA-05  Astrophysics
  • 360-420-DW  Introduction to Computer Programming for Engineering and Science
  • Other activities approved by the Science Program Committee

What do I need to do in Science?

  1. At the beginning of each semester a letter will be sent to you from the office of the Dean of Science, Medical Studies and Engineering through Messages and Documents in your portal. This letter will give you an outline of what your responsibilities are in terms of your Science CE.
  2. You should check your CE Profile Page under My Intranet to ensure all your CE information is accurate and up to date.
  3. Around this time, the Independent Study Registration Form will be available on your CE Profile page for the Fall and Winter semesters only. If you are planning on doing your Independent Study that semester, complete your Independent Study Registration form and return it to the 2D.6 counter by the deadline specified. Allow a week for the CE Coordinator to enter this information and verify again in your CE Profile Page that all the information is accurate.
  4. Your overall cumulative CE grade will be added to your official transcript only at the end of your graduating semester.
  5. Since the CE is not associated with one single course but all four projects combined, keep all your CE assignments and correspondence together in one portfolio or folder.

SOCIAL SCIENCE – 300

(AA, AB, AC, FE, AF, FG, FH, FK, FM, AP, FT, WA, WC)

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Social Science?

In social science, the CE is attached to the Integrative Seminar course (300-308-DW or 300-303-DW).

In the Integrative Seminar, the students must write an essay integrating 2 (300-303-DW) or 3 (300-308-DW) different social science disciplines. The work is divided into many steps and the final step, the final draft of the essay, is the Comprehensive Examination for the 300 program. The final draft of the essay is also the Summative Assessment. A French component will assess student comprehension in French

To pass this course, three components must be met:

  1. Students must attain a total grade of 60% for the course.
  2. Students must complete the oral component.
  3. Students must receive a grade of at least 60% for the final paper (Comprehensive Examination and Summative Assessment).

Both of the last two conditions must be met or the maximum grade the student will receive is 50%. The final paper is the Comprehensive Examination. The final paper is also the Summative Assessment. If one of the two last conditions is not met, the maximum grade the student will receive for the course is 50%.

 

Comprehensive Examination

Pass or Fail

 

and/or

 

% of written comp

 The Comprehensive Examination (which is the final paper) must   meet these criteria:

• Required length: 2500 to 4000 words (2000 to 3000 for IS 300-303-DW)

• Number of required sources: min of 9 to a max of 16 (6 to 12 for 300-303-DW)

•   At least 8 of these sources must be scholarly (5 for 300-303-DWIS3)

•   A minimum of 2 scholarly sources must be used per discipline/aspect (same for IS3)

•   A maximum of 12 scholarly sources may be required (10 for 300-303-DWIS3).

•   The economics department has noted the difficulty of finding appropriate scholarly economics articles, therefore, for this discipline, credible economic sources or texts can be substituted (i.e. textbook, popular economic journals, etc.).

•   Citations (proper format such as MLA or APA)

•   Bibliography/work cited (proper format such as MLA or APA)

If a student fails IS, he also fails the CE and the Summative Assessment, and vice versa. To redo the CE and the Summative Assessment, he must redo the IS.

SOCIAL SERVICE – 388.A1

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Social Service?

The basis for the Comprehensive Examination is the final fieldwork course where students have the opportunity to apply their abilities and demonstrate their competencies in each of the four major competency clusters:

  • Knowledge of Society and Social Structures
  • Knowledge of Human Needs in Different Contexts
  • Development of Professional Social Service Values, Attitudes and Behaviour
  • Development of Intervention Skills

Additionally, fieldwork requirements at this level are such that students must demonstrate, among others, literacy skills in completing agency written work, skills in communicating in both English and French, and skills in maintaining physical and emotional equilibrium in stressful situations. Competencies are developed throughout the three years of the program and reflect both the Specific Education and General Education objectives. 

Evaluation of the Comprehensive Examination

The Comprehensive Examination will consist of five sections:

  1. The Fieldwork Evaluation Form
  1. A written synthesis of practice, relating intervention to learning drawn from each year in the program. The synthesis will include a knowledge component, a component dealing with professional values, attitudes, ethics, and a component addressing professional development.
  1. A verbal presentation of the synthesis
  1. A test of professional letter writing
  1. Completion of the Block B French course requirement of a written and oral program specific project assignment

Passing the Comprehensive Examination signifies that the student is able to integrate the competencies of the program. The achievement of the competencies demonstrates their readiness to practice at an entry level as a social service worker.

VISUAL ARTS – 510.A1

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in Visual Arts?

All students registered in the Visual Arts Program must pass the Comprehensive Examination in order to graduate.

All components of the Comprehensive Examination must be successfully completed in order for a student to be awarded a “Pass”. 

Comprehensive Examination Components:

  • A project related to visual arts in the context of the Block B French course. This component of the Comprehensive Examination is administered by the French Department of Dawson College.
  • A self-directed visual art project integrating the knowledge acquired within the program. This project will take place in the context of the Integrating Studio Practices
  • A written artist statement in English demonstrating the integration of knowledge of art and art history for the Exhibition Catalogue in the context of the Integrating Studio Practices
  • A portfolio of ten original art works in digital format representing an overview of works created within the Visual Arts Program. This portfolio will be submitted in the context of the Integrating Studio Practices
  • Participation in the production of a group art exhibition which will take place at the end of term four in a gallery setting (Dawson College Warren G. Flowers Art Gallery and Visual Arts studios). Planning for the exhibition will take place in the Integrating Studio Practices course and includes working collaboratively in committees to create a catalogue, poster and invitation; raise funds; organize a vernissage; select artworks to be exhibited; and install and take down the exhibition.

3D ANIMATION – 574.B0

How does the Comprehensive Examination work in 3D Animation?

The 3D Animation comprehensive Examination takes place during the third year of the program; students are evaluated to establish their collective artistic and language skills as animators and CGI artists. They must demonstrate an understanding and attain the professional requirements of the industry including the ability to utilize critical thinking and language skills necessary to understand and interpret production pipeline.

The 3D Animation & CGI program uses a multi stage process:

  1. During the semester five, the students will produce a Leica proposal and preproduction of their final film in the Preproduction class. The Leica is first presented to the faculty for critique during week eight of the fifth semester. A panel is then selected from the industry by the faculty to include a film director, an animator and an art director. The Leica is then presented to the industry panel of three, during the final week of the fifth semester. The student’s Leica is evaluated for story structure, production value and industry relevance. There is no mark at this point, the students are given feedback to aid in their success.
  2. In the semester six, the students prepare a personal branding in the form of CV, media packaging and personal web presence during the Career Development class. The students also prepare a reel of their collected work for presentation for their chosen career path.
  3. During the final week of the sixth semester the students must present an oral and written presentation of their final animated film along with their reel to the industry representatives.
  4. Students then prepare a final vernissage where graduating students organize a group presentation of their final film to the industry in general and follow with a showing to the general public. The students will also demonstrate their project development skills through a presentation of drawings and design work.

3D Animation & CGI Comprehensive Examination

Students must demonstrate that they can:

  • Identify and apply the requirements of a 3D Animation or CGI Visual Effects focused short film
  • Participate in every part of the 3D animation production pipeline under the supervision of Animation, Visual Effects, and/or Computer Graphics Supervisors
  • Work with other artists and cultivate creative relationships
  • Use industry standard software to create 3D digital animations for a range of applications within various media industries
  • Adapt to the constantly changing technological tools required of the animation industry
  • Create a full-rendered 3D digitally animated film
  • Present a portfolio appropriate for an entry-level position in the animation industry
  • Communicate effectively at a college level in English both orally and in writing, using appropriate vocabulary, form and style.
  • Communicate adequately at a college level in French as a second language, orally and in writing, using appropriate vocabulary, form and style.
  • Demonstrate attitudes and ethical behaviour essential to professional practice
  • Work independently and with a sense of initiative and responsibility
  • Complement daily work activities with a healthy lifestyle.

The Comprehensive Examination is based on the pass fail ranking. The evaluation is carried out with the industrial representatives and the current teacher. Failing students will be given the opportunity to represent their project during the following calendar year.

The students will be informed of the requirements and obligations in the student handbook and during the Career Development class.



Last Modified: July 8, 2019